Using PowerShell to display network adapters

by Mitch Tulloch [Published on 24 July 2013 / Last Updated on 24 July 2013]

A tip on how you can use Windows PowerShell to display network adapters with 100-Mbps link speed on servers running Windows Server 2012.

You can use the Get-NetAdapter cmdlet to display all network adapters on the server that have a link speed of 100 megabits per second (Mbps) like this:

PS C:\> Get-NetAdapter | Where-Object -FilterScript {$_.LinkSpeed -eq "100 Mbps"}

Name           InterfaceDescription       ifIndex     Status  MacAddress                LinkSpeed
-----------       ------------------------------      -------         ------      --------------------             ---------
Ethernet 2  Broadcom NetXtreme      Gig...  13  Up        A4-BA-DB-0A-96-0C  100 Mbps
Ethernet     Broadcom NetXtreme      Gig...  12  Up         A4-BA-DB-0A-96-0B  100 Mbps

The output of this command consists of objects that can be passed through the pipeline to other cmdlets. For example, you could pipe the output into the Set-NetIPInterface cmdlet to assign a metric value of 5 to all interfaces having a link speed of 100 Mbps as follows:

PS C:\> Get-NetAdapter | Where-Object -FilterScript {$_.LinkSpeed -eq "100 Mbps"} | `
Set-NetIPInterface -InterfaceMetric 5

This tip is excerpted from my latest book Training Guide: Installing and Configuring Windows Server 2012 from Microsoft Press.

Mitch Tulloch is a nine-time recipient of the Microsoft Most Valuable Professional (MVP) award and a widely recognized expert on Windows administration, deployment and virtualization.  For more information see http://www.mtit.com.

The Author — Mitch Tulloch

Mitch Tulloch is a widely recognized expert on Windows administration, networking, and security. He has been repeatedly awarded Most Valuable Professional (MVP) status by Microsoft for his outstanding contributions in supporting users who deploy and use Microsoft platforms, products and solutions. Mitch has published over two hundred articles on different IT websites and magazines, and he has written or contributed to almost two dozen books and is lead author for the Windows 7 Resource Kit from Microsoft Press. For more information, see www.mtit.com .

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