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Win95/98 Connecting to Windows2000

The connection from Windows95/98 to Windows 2000 using TCP/IP is
very similar to the
connection from Windows95/98 to NT4:

The Windows95/98 Dialup-Connection
is configured for TCP/IP (to obtain the
IP-address automatically)


We define the Username and
password, which is permitted to use
the connection (defined using definition
or
configuration of the connection)

 

 
Once the connection is established,
we would like to use the Network
Neighborhood.
(It may take a some time for the
systems to be displayed)
But if the Server is NOT displayed:
Make sure, that the system dialing in
has defined the SAME workgroup
name as the Windows2000 system.
If the systems still are not displayed
(it may be too much work to change
each time the workgroup-name, which
requires on Windows95/98 a restart),
we use the Workaround:
"Find" / "Computer", enter the
name of the called system.

once it is located, we double-click

on it to display the shared
resources.

If you get
"Enter Network Password"
for the resource IPC$:
then you did NOT login properly
to your Windows95/98 system:
The username and password
defined to make the connection is
only used to validate the
connection !


To validate the access to shared
resources (disks, files, printers),
it is the username and password
defined at starting/booting your
system !
With the proper username and
password at BOTH startup/
booting and making the connection,
you can access the data, if it
has been shared for you.



What about connection to the other systems on the network, as they as listed on the
called system in "My Network Places" / "Computers Near Me" ?

if the "Incoming Connection" on the called system is configured to
"Allow callers to access the network"
, we need WINS to be installed somewhere
on the network and the clients to be configured for WINS to get all systems displayed
in the Network Neighborhood.

Without WINS, also "Find" / "Computer" will NOT locate other systems on the network.
(a "Find Computer" sends out a broadcast message, however the called system is acting as a router
between the network segments "modem-modem" and LAN, and routers do NOT forward broadcast
messages).


Workaround:

You need to know the
Computer name and
IP-address of the system,
to which you like to connect.
Make first the TCP/IP
PING test to verify, that
you have a connection to
the system
Then, define the IP-address
and Computer name in
LMHOSTS (add it at the
end of the file, LMHOSTS
on Win95/98 is located in
the WINDOWS-directory,
you may have to rename
LMHOSTS.SAM to LMHOSTS)

To have this new entry take
effect, reboot or run the
command: nbtstat -R
"Find" / "Computer"
knows now the IP-address
and is able to locate the
system on the network,
allowing you to access
the shared resources.

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