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Connect from Windows95/98 to a VPN server

First, we need to connect to the Internet:

On dialing out to the Internet, you need to use
as Username and password the values
assigned to you by your ISP.


now we need to know the IP-address of the VPN-server, because we
need to update/define it now in the properties of the VPN-connection:


While you are still connected via the modem to the Internet, start now the
connection for the VPN, using your network logon username (and password):

Since we now connect to a server,
we need now to use a valid Username
(and password) for a connection to
the VPN-server system.

 

Important notice:
With VPN, you connect via RAS to a server
"like being connected on a local network".
But when being connected via a local network, it is the Username
(and password) entered during bootup , which defines your network
permissions:


And it is the SAME with dialing in via VPN:
When booting up your VPN-client, you MUST already get a network
Logon screen and you MUST enter a Username (and password) valid for
accessing data.
My experience: Enter in the Logon-Window and the VPN-"Connect to"
windows the same Username and password !
(
and don't ask: I do NOT know, why we have to enter this user-information twice)


You can see the communications during the logon process (see the blinking icon in the taskbar):


You have now 2 connections:


And now your are connected to the VPN-server, as if you would be on the same
network cable, as you can see viewing the Network-Neighborhood:

Since your "network cable" is now a
little slow, it takes a little longer.

But then it shows your server:


You are now connected !
but everything takes now a little longer, so get used to:


Don't forget to hang-up on BOTH Dialup-connections, once you are done.


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