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Dial-Up connection to Windows95/Novell-Netware Server

You like to dial in from home to your office Windows95 system and access also the data on your Novell-Netware server ?

That can be setup and configure using the
Dialup-Networking Server, which allows you to setup the following (there is also a possibility to direct dial-in to the Netware server, but I am not covering this here, ask you Novell-Netware supervisor/administrator for this):



Install the "Dial-Up Server" on the office system, then check your "Network" setup, which needs to include:


Quite a long list, but it serve multiple jobs:

To access the Novell-Netware server, we
need the "Client for Netware" and the
"IPX/SPX protocol".
( To access a Windows NT server, we
need the "Client for Microsoft" and the
"NetBEUI protocol".)

To dial out to the Internet, we need the
"Dial-Up Adapter" and "TCP/IP", bound
to the "Dial-Up adapter".

For the remote "Dial-In" with access to the
local disk and the Novell-Servers, we need:
- "File and Printer Sharing for Netware Net."
- "IPX/SPX", bound to the "Dial-Up adapter"
The MS Windows95 Resource Kit states:
" Dial-Up Server supports routing to be able to access a Netware-server or a WindowsNT server using either NetBEUI or IPX/SPX protocol.
The Dial-Up server does NOT support any TCP/IP routing, so you CANNOT use it to get access to a connected server !


Since you are connected to a Novell-Netware server and use on your own systems also the "File and Printer Sharing for Netware networks", the dial-in permissions of the Dial-Up Networking server are now based on the User-database/security of the Netware-server:

If "Dial-Up Server" is not activated, nobody can dial in.
If "Dial-Up Server" is activated, it will only accept calls/connections from qualified/listed users, able to enter their Novell-Netware password:


So, before you go home, you turn on the "Dial-Up Networking Server", which keeps now "monitoring" your modem for incoming calls.

At home, you define now a new "Dial-Up Networking connection", configure it for your office-modem phone-number:

Call up the properties of this connection, and enable on IPX/SPX as allowed Network protocol for this connection.
Check the "Network" in your system:

Since you want to connect to your office network, you need to have a matching setup:
- "Client for Netware Networks"
- "IPX/SPX protocol"
Otherwise, you will not be able to connect or (if you do NOT define the "Client for Netware Networks"), you will NOT be able to browse your Network Neighborhood !

Now, you dial your office-PC (like you dial your Internet-ISP):

Once you are connected, you have access via the Network Neighborhood to all resources on the network:

Please, be patient when calling up
the first time the
"Network Neighborhood",
it takes a while to display



- your own office-PC (in my case 'HELMIG' with its shared C-drive)
- other office-Window95 systems with a "File and Print Sharing"
- the Novell-Netware servers

Just be aware: you are now connected via a modem (like my 28.8 K) and not anymore via the Ethernet-cable, so access to any server-resource is now a lot slower than you are used while working on your office-PC. But it should be sufficient to upload/download some files or to send some print-jobs to the office-printers.


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