SQLite Version 3.4.0

by Vitaly Popovich [Published on 19 June 2007 / Last Updated on 19 June 2007]


SQLite reached version 3.4.0
This release fixes two separate bugs either of which can lead to database corruption. Upgrading is strongly recommended. If you must continue using an older version of SQLite, please at least read about how to avoid these bugs at CorruptionFollowingBusyError and ticket #2418
This release also adds explicit limits on the sizes and quantities of things SQLite will handle. The new limits might causes compatibility problems for existing applications that use excessively large strings, BLOBs, tables, or SQL statements. The new limits can be increased at compile-time to work around any problems that arise. Nevertheless, the version number of this release is 3.4.0 instead of 3.3.18 in order to call attention to the possible incompatibility.
There are also new features, including incremental BLOB I/O and incremental vacuum. See the change log for additional information.
Download URL
http://www.sqlite.org/download.html
About SQLite
SQLite is a small C library that implements a self-contained, embeddable, zero-configuration SQL database engine. Features include:

Transactions are atomic, consistent, isolated, and durable (ACID) even after system crashes and power failures.
Zero-configuration - no setup or administration needed.
Implements most of SQL92. (Features not supported)
A complete database is stored in a single disk file.
Database files can be freely shared between machines with different byte orders.
Supports terabyte-sized databases and gigabyte-sized strings and blobs. (See limits.html.)
Small code footprint: less than 250KiB fully configured or less than 150KiB with optional features omitted.
Faster than popular client/server database engines for most common operations.
Simple, easy to use API.
TCL bindings included. Bindings for many other languages available separately.
Well-commented source code with over 98% test coverage.
Available as a single ANSI-C source-code file that you can easily drop into another project.
Self-contained:

SQLite reached version 3.4.0

This release fixes two separate bugs either of which can lead to database corruption. Upgrading is strongly recommended. If you must continue using an older version of SQLite, please at least read about how to avoid these bugs at CorruptionFollowingBusyError and ticket #2418

This release also adds explicit limits on the sizes and quantities of things SQLite will handle. The new limits might causes compatibility problems for existing applications that use excessively large strings, BLOBs, tables, or SQL statements. The new limits can be increased at compile-time to work around any problems that arise. Nevertheless, the version number of this release is 3.4.0 instead of 3.3.18 in order to call attention to the possible incompatibility.

There are also new features, including incremental BLOB I/O and incremental vacuum. See the change log for additional information.

Download URL

http://www.sqlite.org/download.html

About SQLite

SQLite is a small C library that implements a self-contained, embeddable, zero-configuration SQL database engine. Features include:


  • Transactions are atomic, consistent, isolated, and durable (ACID) even after system crashes and power failures.
  • Zero-configuration - no setup or administration needed.
  • Implements most of SQL92. (Features not supported)
  • A complete database is stored in a single disk file.
  • Database files can be freely shared between machines with different byte orders.
  • Supports terabyte-sized databases and gigabyte-sized strings and blobs. (See limits.html.)
  • Small code footprint: less than 250KiB fully configured or less than 150KiB with optional features omitted.
  • Faster than popular client/server database engines for most common operations.
  • Simple, easy to use API.
  • TCL bindings included. Bindings for many other languages available separately.
  • Well-commented source code with over 98% test coverage.
  • Available as a single ANSI-C source-code file that you can easily drop into another project.
  • Self-contained: no external dependencies.
  • Sources are in the public domain. Use for any purpose.


The SQLite distribution comes with a standalone command-line access program (sqlite) that can be used to administer an SQLite database and which serves as an example of how to use the SQLite library.



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