Greenpeace's Guide to Greener Electronics

by George Chetcuti [Published on 22 Nov. 2012 / Last Updated on 22 Nov. 2012]

This 18th edition of Greenpeace's Guide to Greener Electronics evaluates leading consumer electronics companies based on their commitment and progress in three environmental criteria: Energy and Climate, Greener Products, and Sustainable Operations. The Guide scores companies on overall policies and practices – not on specific products – to provide consumers with a snapshot of the sustainability of the biggest names in the industry. This Guide is not an endorsement for buying products from one company or another.
HP is still above most companies on the ranking, but has lost its top spot from the most recent edition of the Greenpeace Guide to Greener Electronics, and now sits in 2nd position, with 5.7 points, behind newcomer Wipro.
Dell drops to 5th position, with 4.6 points. While Dell scores high overall, the company scores poorly on all Products criteria. Dell previously pushed back its commitment to eliminate polyvinyl chloride plastic (PVC) and brominated frame retardants (BFRs) from 2010 to 2011. Yet, Dell still hasn't removed these chemicals from all of its products as promised, and still has no phase-out date for hazardous substances.
Apple drops to 6th position, with a score of 4.6. Though one of the high scorers in this edition, Apple misses out on points for lack of transparency on GHG emission reporting, clean energy advocacy, further information on its management of toxic chemicals, and details on post-consumer recycled plastic use.
Read more here - http://www.greenpeace.org/international/Global/international/publications/climate/2012/GuideGreenerElectronics/Full-Scorecard.pdf
I'd like to wish all WindowsNetworking.com US Readers a very special Thanksgiving Day for you and your family.
 

This 18th edition of Greenpeace's Guide to Greener Electronics evaluates leading consumer electronics companies based on their commitment and progress in three environmental criteria: Energy and Climate, Greener Products, and Sustainable Operations. The Guide scores companies on overall policies and practices – not on specific products – to provide consumers with a snapshot of the sustainability of the biggest names in the industry. This Guide is not an endorsement for buying products from one company or another.

HP is still above most companies on the ranking, but has lost its top spot from the most recent edition of the Greenpeace Guide to Greener Electronics, and now sits in 2nd position, with 5.7 points, behind newcomer Wipro.

Dell drops to 5th position, with 4.6 points. While Dell scores high overall, the company scores poorly on all Products criteria. Dell previously pushed back its commitment to eliminate polyvinyl chloride plastic (PVC) and brominated frame retardants (BFRs) from 2010 to 2011. Yet, Dell still hasn't removed these chemicals from all of its products as promised, and still has no phase-out date for hazardous substances.

Apple drops to 6th position, with a score of 4.6. Though one of the high scorers in this edition, Apple misses out on points for lack of transparency on GHG emission reporting, clean energy advocacy, further information on its management of toxic chemicals, and details on post-consumer recycled plastic use.

Read more here - http://www.greenpeace.org/international/Global/international/publications/climate/2012/GuideGreenerElectronics/Full-Scorecard.pdf

I'd like to wish all WindowsNetworking.com US Readers a very special Thanksgiving Day for you and your family.

 

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