Windows 2000 Network Sharing

by Johannes Helmig [Published on 16 Sept. 2003 / Last Updated on 16 Sept. 2003]

Defining a Network Share under Windows 2000 is very much the same as under Windows NT4:

Right-click on the Disk-icon
in "My Computer" to share a
complete disk or on any
folder-icon to partially share
a disk, and select "Sharing"
All NT4 and Windows2000 disks
have already an invisible share
for each disk, called C$, D$,....
This is the "Administrative Share",
allowing a Domain Administrator
to connect via the network to your
systems and to configure it.
Please, do NOT delete this share.
(and since the Sharename uses
as last character the '$'-sign
,
such administrative shares are
never shown in the
"Network Neighborhood" or
"Computers Near Me".


To create a Share-definition
usable for regular users, click on
the button "New Share".

Define the Share-name:
This name is displayed in the
"Network Neighborhood" or
"Computers Near Me" to identify
this disk or folder.

Check the "Permissions":
By default, Everyone has
"Full Control".

No misunderstanding:
Everyone is not each person
managing to connect via the
network to this system, but
the User-group EVERYONE,
which automatically contains
all users defined on THIS system
in the User-Manager.
A word of warning:
If you have Windows95/98/ME systems,
which need to access this share, limit the
name to max. 12 characters, otherwise
the share will NOT be listed in the
Network Neighborhood of Win9x/ME..
You can still access such a share via the
NET USE-command (details like NT4)
This disk has now 2 Share-names:
- the Administrative Share
- The User-defined Share.

Just make sure, that you select
the right one, when making a
change.

The disk (or the Folder) is ready to be accessed via the Network.

See Also


The Author — Johannes Helmig

Dr.Johannes Helmig is working as Director, Technical Knowledge Management in the Belgium office of Gerber Technology where he is involved in Customer Service and internal training, with special interest in Networking.

Advertisement

Featured Links